stevenson
Edmund Spenser

My Love Is Like To Ice

Edmund Spenser

Edmund Spenser
(1552-1599)

My love is like to ice, and I to fire:
How comes it then that this her cold so great
Is not dissolved through my so hot desire,
But harder grows the more I her entreat?
Or how comes it that my exceeding heat
Is not allayed by her heart-frozen cold,
But that I burn much more in boiling sweat,
And feel my flames augmented manifold?
What more miraculous thing may be told,
That fire, which all things melts, should harden ice,
And ice, which is congeal’s with senseless cold,
Should kindle fire by wonderful device?
Such is the power of love in gentle mind,
That it can alter all the course of kind.

/ by Edmund Spenser /

3110_b_886

The Carpenter’s Son

3110_b_886

“Here the hangman stops his cart:
Now the best of friends must part.
Fare you well, for ill fare I:
Live, lads, and I will die.

“Oh, at home had I but stayed
‘Prenticed to my father’s trade,
Had I stuck to plane and adze,
I had not been lost, my lads.

“Then I might have built perhaps
Gallows-trees for other chaps,
Never dangled on my own,
Had I left but ill alone.

“Now, you see, they hang me high,
And the people passing by
Stop to shake their fists and curse;
So ’tis come from ill to worse.

“Here hang I, and right and left
Two poor fellows hang for theft:
All the same’s the luck we prove,
Though the midmost hangs for love.

“Comrades all, that stand and gaze,
Walk henceforth in other ways;
See my neck and save your own:
Comrades all, leave ill alone.

“Make some day a decent end,
Shrewder fellows than your friend.
Fare you well, for ill fare I:
Live lads, and I will die.”

/ by Alfred Edward Housman /

Langston-Hughes
william-henry-ogilvie poems

The Bush, My Lover

william-henry-ogilvie poems

The camp-fire gleams resistance
To every twinkling star;
The horse-bells in the distance
Are jangling faint and far;
Through gum-boughs torn and lonely
The passing breezes sigh;
In all the world are only
My star-crowned Gove and I.

The still night wraps Macquarie;
The white moon, drifting slow,
Takes back her silver glory
From watching waves below;
To dalliance I give over
Though half the world may chide,
And clasp my one true Lover
Here on Macquarie side.

The loves of earth grow olden
Or kneel at some new shrine;
Her locks are always golden-
This brave Bush-Love of mine;
And for her star-lit beauty,
And for her dawns dew-pearled,
Her name in love and duty
I guard against the world.

They curse her desert places!
How can they understand
Who know not what her face is
And never held her handy-
Who may have heard the meeting
Of boughs the wind has stirred,
Yet missed the whispered greeting
Our listening hearts have heard.

For some have travelled over
The long miles at her side,
Yet claimed her not as Lover
Nor thought of her as Bride:
And some have followed after
Through sun and mist for years,
Nor held the sunshine laughter,
Nor guessed the raindrops tears.

And if her droughts are bitter,
Her dancing mirage vain-
Are all things gold that glitter?
What pleasure but hath pain?
And since among Love’s blisses
Love’s penalties must live,
Shall we not take her kisses,
And, taking them, forgive?

The winds of Dawn are roving
The river-oaks astir . . .
What heart were torn of loving
That had no I’ve but her?
Till last red stars are lighted
And last winds wander West,
Her troth and mine are plighted-
The lover I love best!

/ by William Henry Ogilvie /

Lewis Carroll
(1832 – 1898)

A Sea Dirge

 Lewis Carroll (1832 – 1898)

Lewis Carroll
(1832 – 1898)

A Sea Dirge

There are certain things – as, a spider, a ghost,
The income-tax, gout, an umbrella for three -
That I hate, but the thing that I hate the most
Is a thing they call the Sea.

Pour some salt water over the floor -
Ugly I’m sure you’ll allow it to be:
Suppose it extended a mile or more,
THAT’S very like the Sea.

Beat a dog till it howls outright -
Cruel, but all very well for a spree:
Suppose that he did so day and night,
THAT would be like the Sea.

I had a vision of nursery-maids;
Tens of thousands passed by me -
All leading children with wooden spades,
And this was by the Sea.

Who invented those spades of wood?
Who was it cut them out of the tree?
None, I think, but an idiot could -
Or one that loved the Sea.

It is pleasant and dreamy, no doubt, to float
With ‘thoughts as boundless, and souls as free':
But, suppose you are very unwell in the boat,
How do you like the Sea?

There is an insect that people avoid
(Whence is derived the verb ‘to flee’).
Where have you been by it most annoyed?
In lodgings by the Sea.

If you like your coffee with sand for dregs,
A decided hint of salt in your tea,
And a fishy taste in the very eggs -
By all means choose the Sea.

And if, with these dainties to drink and eat,
You prefer not a vestige of grass or tree,
And a chronic state of wet in your feet,
Then – I recommend the Sea.

For I have friends who dwell by the coast -
Pleasant friends they are to me!
It is when I am with them I wonder most
That anyone likes the Sea.

They take me a walk: though tired and stiff,
To climb the heights I madly agree;
And, after a tumble or so from the cliff,
They kindly suggest the Sea.

I try the rocks, and I think it cool
That they laugh with such an excess of glee,
As I heavily slip into every pool
That skirts the cold cold Sea.
by Lewis Carroll

as-one-we-are

We are the World!

There comes a time when we hear a certain call
When the world must come together as one
There are people dying and it’s time to lend a hand
To life the greatest gift of all.

We can’t go on pretending day by day
That someone, somewhere will soon make a change
We are all part of God’s great big family
And the truth, you know, love is all we need

We are the world, we are the children
We are the ones who make a brighter day so let’s start giving
There’s a choice we’re making, we’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day just you and me

Well, send them your heart so they’ll know that someone cares
And their lives will be stronger and free
As God has shown us by turning stones to bread
And so we all must lend a helping hand

We are the world, we are the children
We are the ones who make a brighter day so let’s start giving
There’s a choice we’re making, we’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day just you and me

When you’re down and out, there seems no hope at all
But if you just believe, there’s no way we can fall
Well, well, well, well let us realize that a change can only come
When we stand together as one

We are the world, we are the children
We are the ones who make a brighter day so let’s start giving
There’s a choice we’re making, we’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day just you and me

We are the world, we are the children
We are the ones who make a brighter day so let’s start giving
There’s a choice we’re making, we’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day just you and me

We are the world, we are the children
We are the ones who make a brighter day so let’s start giving
There’s a choice we’re making, we’re saving our own lives
It’s true we’ll make a better day just you and me…..

as-one-we-are